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'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islam you can republic of iran." the first of these themes, and these two really get at the heart of our book. the first of these themes is that the united states is today and has been for the past few years a power in relative decline in the middle east. and the second core theme is that the biggest beneficiary of america's ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative positions of the united states and the islamic republic of iran in the middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11, just over ten years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east was either pro-american, like the governments in egypt and turkey, in negotiations effectively to become pro-american, like the governments in syria and libya, or anti-iranian like the taliban government in afghanistan and saddam hussein's government in iraq. ev
that opened up hope for six and a half million people. the problem is the united states has never been very good, whether it's in afghanistan, iraq, in creating an alternative and the bol line is the united states basically walked away when it came to how do you create a new state, how do you facilitate the diverse forces, whether it's the tribal elements, more than 300 militias that had formed during that brief eight-month involvement, how do you stem the flow of weaponry and create an alternative. if you saw charlie wilson's war, at the very ending of the movie when he says i raised all this money, billions of dollars for arms to the opposition to fight off the soviets but i couldn't raise a couple of million dollars for education. it's the same kind of problem. we're not good at figuring out what alternatives are and as a result libya destabilized and a lot of the arms that went into libya, a lot of the forces that were militarized flowed not just into mali and algeria but across a huge chunk of northwest africa. as a result you see a huge destabilization that's affect in turn little tun
alongside men on the front liance. some opponents say this could lead to problems with unit cohesion and combat readiness. >> my issue here is, mixing the genderses in infantry units and armored units and special forces units is not a positive. there are many distracters which puts a burden on the small unit combat leaders and actually creates an environment because of their living conditions that is not conducive to readiness. >> reporter: others claim women suffer more combat casualties than illnesses and pregnancy is an issue. to senator john mccain, it's equal standards for certain demanding jobs. >> i think women are obviously -- are prepared to serve side by side with men in combat. i just want to emphasize, though, there should be the same physical and mental standards for anyone to perform certain roles and functions in the military. >> reporter: many say it's a question of equal rights and serving in combat allows a soldier to advance through the ranks, farther and faster. >> the bottom line is we need to treat people like individuals. what are the capabilities they bring to
with impunity. for the united states it hasn't been an area of vital interest ever. it's much closer to europe. it's much more of concern to europe than it has ever been for the united states. that's why we kind of led from behind. >> in libya. >> in libya itself. because europeans were the ones exercised about it. we didn't care that much in terms of vital national interests compare today say the gulf. but just as after the soviet union was thrown out of afghanistan, we considered afghanistan not of any real interest to us and of course that's where al qaeda took root. so here again we've got that problem. and we cannot afford to let this just burgeon forth because you can see in the attack in algeria that american lives are at stake here. >> this was the point secretary clinton made as part of her testimony. she says anywhere the united states is not have a significant involvement, particularly in such areas of instability and a threat from a jihadist movement and affiliate say of al qaeda, there could be real problems. we see it in algeria and yet what did we hear from the president this we
not be so in the united states military? >> no, i cannot think of any reason. and i have heard the naysayers. i no there are many out there that believe this cannot be done without compromising those standards . having served almost 38 years in an institution where i have lived and scene change throughout my career, and i can assure you, being one of the very first female officers had the opportunity to attend airborne school, and you can imagine the looks on the instructors. it was not a popular decision. but, can assure you that having that opportunity to go to airborne school. people say why you want to jump out of a perfectly good airplane? well, it was exciting. it sounded challenging. so i had the opportunity to do that, but by having that opportunity that later opened the door for me to serve in the esteemed 802nd airborne division and command there. i had the opportunity to go to jet master's cool. that is a very prestigious and demanding school. primarily male dominated. i was the only female in the class surrounded by special forces folks. you know, they didn't change the standards
of housing exceeds their income. and they're in the top 10% of income in the united states. that means housing is no longer accessible to the middle class. and when the middle class can't buy housing, the middle clarks as we have known it, since 1950, ceases to exist. so that's part two of the book. i've got programs that don't work, programs that do work, and then the intellectual challenge, which really took the longest period to get my head around, was, okay, if you know that these programs don't work and you've got a good fix on why, and you know these programs do work and you have a good fix on why, are you capable of developing a social program or a blueprint for a program that would work? and that turned out to be quite tricky. you would like to have -- help children. you would like to deal with social disadvantage of children, and the road block is simply not in the political wards, whether you're on the left of center, right of center, or right on the center. our government is not about to help children by directing significant social resources to their parents. so, one of the
the ban on women in combat units. >> therefore today, general dempsey and i, are pleased to announce that we are eliminating the direct ground combat exclusion rule for women. and we are moving forward with a plan to eliminate all unnecessary gender based barriers to service. >> so, eliminating this ban is going to take time. the military now begins what officials call, quote, the assessment phase. they will examine all units and produce a time line. every three months leaders have to check in on progress, and if it's found that a woman is not fit for the unit, exemption may be sought. >> your mission for today, you are going to the village of -- >> thank you, thank you. >> we've intel that there's possibly three to five fighters out in the village. you are going to be going out with osi to do a source meet in the village with ahmed at the car garage, be aware that they are possibly armed with rpgs and small arms. ahmed, this is tech sgt. andrea jefferson's worst nightmare, taking on enemy fire and a comrade goes down. >> he is bleeding here, hold pressure on the wound. >> as an air
this is not happening in a vacuum. we have a nuclear situation that is not just russia and the united states. i was in north korea and south korea a week ago. we know what they are doing. when you say we want the zero new, obama has said that. i do not blame him for wanting to avoid it. it is hard to explain. he is a friend of mine. chuck hagel is a personal friend. this is too important. when you have 20 kids and grandkids, you want to keep america strong and have a defense system that is not light on the progress on nuclear capability. >> i would like to know what you think of his chances of getting confirmation and weather coming out against him could poison the water in your relationship if you become secretary? >> no, i told him i was going to oppose him. we had a nice conversation. it is hard for people to believe this. regardless of what happens, if the end of doing it over my objection, we're still going to be friends. he has a big job to do. i think we'll have a good relationship. at nothing at all influence that many people. -- i do not think i will influence that many people. >> if i
, as well as the united states drone strikes in the area, not as much attention has been paid to the actual people who live there, in their point of view. in our public opinion survey, while not starving and some of its conclusions, i think it's an insight into where future policy might head. here's some of the key findings, and their set forth in the book in detail. nearly nine out of every 10 residents in the fatah region opposed u.s. military operation. this is not a few that slightly held. in fact, passionately and intensely help but here's one measure of why. when only one in 10 people, flat top, flat top, one and 10 full-time residents, in tribal areas think that suicide attacks are ever justified against pakistani military forces, almost six in 10 believe these attacks are justified against the united states military. much of the antipathy towards the united states stems from one cause and one cause really only. and that against cia director jon strikes on militants living in the area. more than three quarters of fatah residents oppose these strikes. however, this opposition to ameri
worldwide with the size of that economy including in japan, the united states, china. look at the trade figures worldwide. in 2010 trade grew coming out of the great recession 13.9%, and in 2011 it was 5%, and i think the final figures for last year, 2012, will be somewhere between 2.5 or 2.7. so it's no wonder that you have the problems that you do in major economies worldwide with the slowdown in trade. and i think that unfortunately, i think that we're going to see a continuation of the problems in europe at least for the most part of 2013, just take a look at the latest figures out of germany which was the strongest economy in the eurozone when it came out. and we have our own problems, as you're aware, here in the united states notwithstanding getting by the immediate crisis at the end of this year on the so-called fiscal cliff. all we managed to do was to put off some of the biggest decisions for another two or three months. so i think, you know, europe has managed along with a little help from ourselves and elsewhere has managed to cloud the world economy. in the case of japan, i
private organizations that infrastructure in the united states needs repair. we know from examples in other countries that if you have proper infrastructure it over time attracts business and we can shed this whole nonsense about taking on debt for our grandchildren if we create a place where it's fascinating and profitable to do business. >> and it's economic security for your grandchildren. i guess this becomes a message that has to change here where instead of talking about spending and federal government getting bigger and more involved in the economy and your life we have to be talking about investing and using the government the way it should be to invest and put us in the right position so we can compete with the rest of the world that by the world is going crazy doing infrastructure spending using cash in many cases to do it, something we don't have. >> just changing the words won't fix it. obama has also said investing as a synonym for spending. investing has to be investing. >> if we can't get behind a no-brainer like this, a public/private infrastructure bank, we have a
see that? >> i do. i think you will see them probably in all of those units. you already see them serving in functions around the units, intelligence pie localities and whatnot. there are positions that are much better for females. there are things you can do in special operations with females more difficult to do with just men. so i think it -- it will come. it is easy to milwaukee a policy decision. i support that policy. as we implement it, it will be a little complex, because with rights come responsibility. right now, any mail can be moved to any job in the military for needs of the service. so once you open the door with rights, theoretically, you open the door where any female can be put in a combat position and we'll have to work our way through that. >> what does that mean for the requirements? because do you -- females as we know, just physically in general certainly there are females stronger than males, but in general, when you go -- when you go to some of the special forces, there are some physical things about women that make them less strong than men. >> there are t
to the united states, what our relationship with the middle east was. and that led to the bin ladens, a book intended to be about saudi arabia and how complicated for this generation of oil broomers to come of age in the 70s when the kingdom was awash in wealth and had to all go out and buy identities in the world, and unand one of them became a notorious terrorist do and the others moved to florida. and when i finished with that project i wanted to write about oil and american power in the post-9/11 context, and i started out -- actually the book about exxonmobil began as a book about oil and geopolitics. i wanted to essentially take the prize, the book by dany ergen that had inspired me and update it. i thought of the prize as a great work of nonfiction about the era of oil that was an era of expansion and discovery, and i wanted to write a book about global oil in the era of limits and constraintses and climates and the rest of it. so i started out on that kind of open framework and got -- thought i needed a subject, company. and once i came to that conclusion, then for an american audien
the policy barring women in the military from combat units. but another priority, strength ling gun laws, will be much harder. >> these weapons do not belong on the street of our towns, our cities, in our schools, in our malls, in our workplaces, in our movie theaters. enough is enough. >> schieffer: almost 20 years ago, california democrat dianne feinstein pushed an vault weapons ban through congress. can she do it again, and is it the answer? she's with us this morning along with new york city's top cop ray kelly. as president begins his second term, republicans are rethinking who they are and where they go here. >> we can't get rattled. we won't play the villain in his morality plays. we have to stay united. >> schieffer: we'll hear more on that from newt gingrich. tennessee republican representative, marsha blackburn. for analysis, being bring there david ignatius of the "washington post." david sanger of the "new york times," and from campaign 2012, obama adviser stephanie cutter, and romney adviser kevin madden. back to face off one more time because this is "face the nation." capt
to improve theirs life. so seven years ago we really have a feeling that in the united states, we really need to increase our hope also. and we decided to do that by creating a global art project, the world, tree of hope. and what you see behind you is a live, 23-foot christmas tree and it is covered with 10,000 pieces of oragami and most of it is white cranes and all of the white cranes on the tree are inscribed with people's wish and hopes for the world. merilee put out an invitation that goes out virally through the internet and we ask people what they want for the future of the world and share it with us. and wishes are send in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is
to designate the facility of united states postal service located at 401 old dixie highway in jupiter, florida, as the roy post office building. the first lieutenant, the brigadier general post office building. the nicky nick daniel bacon post office. >> in the last congress, lawmakers passed 45 bills renaming post offices. it did not get around to a bill overhauling the postal system to keep it solvent. thanks for watching "state of the union" i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu. fareed zakaria "gps" is next. >>> this is gps the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you from davos, switzerland. i interviewed one king, seven prime ministers and one head of government. we'll see them in coming weeks. this week one king and one prime minister. we'll start with the king of jordan, abdullah ii. his nation sits in turmoil between syria, egypt, iraq and saudi arabia. despite some protests, jordan hasn't had its own arab spring. everyone was watching the parliamentary elections this week. will they satisfy
policy. we don't live in a free market in the united states, we live in a mixed economy. it varies by industry. technology which by the way has done very well, the most regulated industry in the world this financial-services. that's where we had our biggest problem, not surprisingly because that's where we had our biggest problems. second of the policy created a massive disinvestment. they got focused on the residential real-estate market. the global burst as all due. at the large financial institutions that calls wall street and made serious mistakes. if i had been in charge of a but let the institutions fail. however the states were secondary and in the context of an incentive by government policy. almost everything we've done in the financial crisis started was a long time period even things that might be helping a low but in the short term will dramatically reduce the standard of living in the long-term. fifth point even though there's and a lot of economic financial causes the real cost to the real cure philosophical, and i'm going to focus on that in my presentation, and then
of the united states, a cold spell have been talking about for days has finally ended and temperatures are coming back to normal. i want to show you what we can see as weak note toward monday. getting above freezing, a normal temperature there. toward atlanta, a partly cloudy day. focus" only on the link tv. >> a reminder now of the top stories -- at least 230 people have died in a fire at night club in southern brazil. witnesses say musicians that off fireworks on stage and some victims were trampled to death in the panic to escape. in egypt, six people had died in violence during funerals for the more than 30 people killed in clashes on saturday. french and forces in mali fighting against the rebels are on the outskirts of the city of timbuktu. our correspondent is traveling with the french military on the road to timbuktu. >> french forces are amassing in this depot just to the southwest of timbuktu. we have seen troops from all here as well, preparing weaponry and assembling heavy guns. these are the strongest signals we have had get that the final event on timbuktu is imminent. th
of president of the of the united states. >> and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend. preserve, protect and defend. >> the constitution of the united states. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >> congratulations, mr. president. >> it it was a big day for barack obama on monday taking ceremonial oath of office for second term it was a big day for the media as well. jim, we had cnn's jim saying he had to pinch himself. al roker screaming to get the president's attention. what happened to reporting? >> don't forget chris matthews comparing it to the gettysburg address. i think that noah rothman summarized it very well. he said this is a tale of two inaugurals. in 2005, which is to say bush 43 second inaugural smead i can't sneers in 2013. media cheers. he could be alluding to the endless discussion of how great mrs. obama was dressing and kids and so on. how this was great. in contrast to the 2005 inaugural just 8 short years ago when the discussion was any money spent on the inaugural washo coming at the expense of the poor.
in the united states and the notion of sectionalism that organizes our understanding of american political history? but slavery is national and communities of runaway slaves should be understood understood, of a rude of future to the slave community and the links between those of african descent and slaves in the southern states are important circuits that we should pay more attention to. >> host: what are the primary documents you used? >> i used a lot of different things. i used narratives written by slaves that had run away to freedom. what struck me is although we think about the mason-dixon line or the ohio river then you were free, but we tend to focus on the first path of the narrative of the enslavement in the south sat when you got to the other side, as the gray area of freedom and how precarious life was in the so-called free states and many runaways felt the need to go to canada or britain because there was no way to achieve freedom because of the slave laws. these were important. looking at the emancipation statutes passed by individual states and recognizing basically they onl
in combat. my issue here is, mixing the genders in infantry units, armored units and special forces units is not a positive, there are many distract tors which puts a burden on small unit combat leaders and actually creates an environment because of their living conditions that is not conducive to readiness. >> chris: colonel mcsally, those are the two basic arguments. you are a combat pilot but you are not formally, not in combat on the front lines, you are attached to combat units and the two arguments are, one, physical limitations, particularly to serving in the infantry and also the question of a distraction during operations, when you are in close quarters, there is no privacy and rugged living conditions and look in your camera and tell general boykin why he's wrong. >> let me just say i realize flying combat aircraft and being on the ground in combat are two very different missions, hover the same flawed arguments were used against allowing women to fly in combat and now allowing them to be on ground combat. like the general said these are flawed arguments the battle line is we ne
and sharing their vision . stay united and stay focused on true conservative principles. ryan speaking today warning that president obama will try to villanize congressional republicans to achieve his goal and down played the republican party's imminent down fall . instead ryan pointing out why he believes that the gop is poised for a rebound. >> we can't get rattled. we will not play the villian in his morality plays. we have to stay united and we have to show that if given the chance, we can govern. we have better ideas. >> you know, the fact is, that we are not in the wilderness. republicans control the house and most state houses. >> molly live with us tonight. molly, congressman ryan said that republicans will have a stronger argument in the president's second term, why >> because he said that now republicans can show voters what actually happens when the president's agenda is implemented. >> in the president's first term we argued against big government in theory n second term, we'll argue about big government in practice it is not a bill. it is 13,000 pages of regulation and growing a
the facility of the united states postal service located at 401 old dixie highway in jupiter, florida as the royce shallard blue post office. >> the nicky mcdaniel bacon post office. >> in the last congress, lawmakers passed 45 bills renaming post offices. it did not get around to a political overhauling the postal system to keep it solvent. >> i'm cached crndy crowley in washington. if you missed any part of today's show, find us on i-tunes, just search state of the union. fareed zakaria, gps is next. >> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm far reez zakaria. this week at the world economic forum, i have interviewed one king, seven prime ministers and one head of government. you will see them in coming weeks, this week we have one king and one prime minister. we'll start with the king of jordan, abdullah ii. his nation sits astride a region in turmoil. despite some protests, jordan hasn't had its own arab spring. everyone was watching the parliamentary elections this week, will they satisfy protesters? or inflame t
. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you from davos, switzerland. i interviewed one king, seven prime ministers and one head of government. we'll see them in coming weeks. this week one king and one prime minister. we'll start with the king of jordan, abdullah ii. his nation sits in turmoil between syria, egypt, iraq and saudi arabia. despite some protests, jordan hasn't had its own arab spring. everyone was watching the parliamentary elections this week. will they satisfy protesters or inflame them? we'll get the king's reaction. then, the prime minister of r h russia dmitry medvedev. some call it a new cold war. who's to blame and will russia help in syria? we'll discuss it all. >>> also, the algerian hostage crisis that left dozens dead. is this a sign of a grave, new terror threat? i'll tell you my view. >>> but, first, here's my take. every year at davos people like me try to get a sense of the mood of the place. take the temperature of people in this frosty mountain resort. obviously, i will give you a highly impressionist
'll already see them serving in functions average those units, intelligence pilots and whatnot. they are positions that are much better for females. there are things you can do in special operations with females that are more difficult to do with just men. i think it will come. but it's easy to make a policy decision and i support that policy. as we implement it, it's going to be a little bit complex. because with rights come responsibility right now any male can be moved to any job in the military for needs of the service. so once you open the door with rights, theoretically, you open the door to any female that's in the service can be put in a combat position, simply for needs of the service. and i think we'll just have to work our way through that. >> what does that mean for the requirements. because females, as we know just physically in general, certainly there are females that are stronger than males. especially some of the special forces, there are just some physical things about women that make them less strong than men. >> there are two kinds of standards, one set of s
substantial and high profile measures this after the united nations security council tightened sanctions against pyongyang after they launched the rocket last month. they will keep testing nuclear devices as part of an all out action against america promising to launch a rocket that could hit us, too. what do we do? general jack keen a general former vice chief of staff to the army. good morning. >> hi eric. >> this is amazing they have another nuclear test it could be the third. can they be stopped? >> well, we haven't stopped them to date that's for sure. we have done a lot of negotiations a lot of diplomacy prior oh to them developing the nuclear weapon. we have done the same thing since they have had a nuclear weapon and haven't been able to stop them from testing. kim ju kim jong-un is a young guy flexing his muscle politically. he wants to send a strong message to his people and the people of the region that he is a strong powerful leader following the foot steps of his father and his grandfather. operationally it is a threat. right now off the cos of hawaii they can reach alaska a
. it's not just rureb i can't and the united states as people like to think. niffs korea a week ago and we know what they are doing with their capability. when you say we want zero nukes and he's said that and obama has said that. it's hard to explain this to people. he is a friend of mine. i'm talking about senator hagel is a personal friend. but this is too important. when you have 20 pped kids and grandkids you want a system that is not light on the progress in nuclear capability. >> i'd like to know what you think his chances are of getting confirmation and whether you coming out against him could poison the relationship with him if he becomes secretary of defense? >> no, because i told him in my office i was going to oppose him and we had a nice cordle conversation. he said that regardless of what happens if he ends up doing it over my objection that we're still going to be friends. he's got a big job to do, he's going to need me and me him. so i think we'll have a good relationship. and i don't think i'm going to influence that many people. i've looked at it and feel he's not
such a pronounced view that dominates the arena but we have the united states conference of mayors we have the major city chiefs, we have the largest police organization in the world supporting us, we have individual chiefs and sheriffs. we have pediatricians trauma room surgeons, teachers-- you name it, all the way down-- we have the clergy. we have the dean of the nationalica needald launch this and talk about effort he's going to put together among clergy of all types and sex and religion in addition the united states to support this. this is an uphill climb. it is a different bill than i introduced. we go from two physical characteristics in the definition of an assault weapon to one. we ban 158 specific guns by make and model. we grandfather 2200 weapons by make and model that are rifles, shotguns pistols used for recreation defense hunting. we ban clips drums or strips of more than 10 bullets. prohibit their manufacture their sale, their transfer. we are different from the new york state law. we do not require registration of grandfathered weapons. and in that regard we are also different from
training which will have the consequence in the near term that units won't be ready to go to war. the ones that are available for other contingencies. if it goads on long enough will do damage to redness that will be difficult and take years to reverse. we don't want to take that kind we don't want to take that kind of step until we it's been a long, tough year. a real test of what i'm made of. there were times i thought of giving in, but i did it. opened up that navy federal savings account and now we have this... ah. did it all online... it was easy. i don't hear any sweating. civilians... psh. 4 million members. 4 million stories. navy federal credit union. >>> we're back with dr. ashton carter the deputy secretary of defense. sir i want to take you to a question where folks are asking whether the plan that you guys built, the $487 billion that was going to cut is not going to be something that's going to actually have something that's going to have another couple of hundred billion dollars in cuts that are going to come on top of it. secretary panetta repeatedly said no that's the plan
to be and by the way, they announced this week lowest percentage of union labor in the united states and by the way, so far we haven't had economcalamity. >> brenda: so far it's taking the labor board out of commission for a while. does that help the economy? >> oh, i believe it does, because it gets to, i think, a bigger issue, brenda, finally, maybe, a little tamp down on government overreach, you know, in obama's inauguration speech, it was all about growing government even bigger than it already is. and the problem is, when government grows, the private sector suffers. and if you say, well, who cares where the money goes, the problem is government growth is always less inefficient than private sector growth and this is one step toward hopefully allowing the private sector to grow, tamping down on unions which i think have hurt many, many, many industries, despite the higher wages. in the union you have higher wages until you lose your job, and i think this is a step forward, this is progress, what needs to be done. >> brenda: you know, jonas, toby brought up a good point. which is that union member
concerns about whether he will ever make it back home safely to the united states shannon bream is live in washington. what's the latest on this case? >> family and friends of the pastor fear his life and death 8 year sentence in one of the most dangerous prisons. born in iran but has american citizenship with doing work with orphanage in iran when he was arrested last summer. accord to the american center for law and justice which has been fighting to get him released he was sentenced without warning for threatening national security because of his work with christian house churches in iran jordan of the acl has been representing the families pastor recently sent a disturbing letter from jail. prisoner there's every day. second, they won't even give that to him. because the nurse at the hospital for the national security criminal, he is too unclean as if like a cass system because is he a convert and now is he a threat. so he is not even getting medical care his wife says with today's development i am deficit stayed for my husband and my family. we must now pursue every effort. turn ev
summer, maybe. the developments across north africa have huge implications for the united states. to give you one example -- any time you had areas where there is no rule of law and where there is no government, you have a place where al qaeda or al qaeda type affiliate's can take root. as we have those places, they feed things -- they see things. they see plots, they contemplate plot against the united states. just because they have not had a major terrorist attack in the homeland in the last few years does not mean that we can seal ourselves off from the rest of such an attack. we live in a world where what happened in north africa and country that people may not have even heard of before really can have a direct impact, whether you live in washington, d.c., los angeles or any place in between. >> we also have homegrown terrorists and so called lone wolves. when we are dealing with american citizens inside our country, there is a different rate that applies. our constitution and our fourth amendment. aseptic that where that line is between freedom of expression, protected by our first a
is very dramatic. this represents a huge threat to the united states. there are others that would argue it is more a regional. the ability to react is clearly limited. when you look at individual things, there are concernes. afghanistan is another issue. >> watched "newsmakers" with senator james inhofe today at 6:00 p.m. eastern. next on c-span, secretary of state hillary clinton on the benghazi attack in president obama's second inaugural address followed by reaction to president obama's speech from mitch mcconnell and lamar alexander. now testimony from hillary clinton on the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. secretary clinton took responsibility for the deaths of four americans including ambassador chris stevens. this is one of her last hearings before she steps down. john kerry is the nomination to replace her. from the foreign relations committee, this is to 0.5 hours. -- 2.5 hours. >> let me begin by welcoming the new members to the committee. since the false and that has not passed the committee resolution of official late seating members, i want to ask consent to allow
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